Gardens On Our Wish List....

We're so lucky to work in the garden industry, and we're constantly pouring over garden magazines showing us gardens we'd love to visit, so this got us thinking and making a list of Gardens to visit on our own wish list, and we're kicking off with these four, all of which really need no introduction, such is their fame to any true Gardenista!

Our list is ever evolving & we certainly hope to visit some of them in the not too distyant future.  Before visiting, do please check that they are now open following relaxation of Lockdown rules.

Great Dixter

With an almost cult-like following in the gardening world, Great Dixter was the home of gardener and gardening writer Christopher Lloyd (1921-2006). The house and garden were originally restored by Lutyens in the 1920s to create a series of enclosures and garden themes. One of the most famous and revered of all gardens, certainly in the UK, but possibly the world.  Great Dixter is seen as the pinnacle of gardening and this is being upheld by Fergus Garrett, the head gardener, who worked so closely with Christopher Lloyd. 

Sissinghurst

Sissinghurst Castle garden was created by Vita Sackville-West and Harold Nicolson who transformed the ruins of this Elizabethan mansion and gardens in the 1930s. The castle tower dating from the 16th century is virtually all that remains of the grand Manor House.
The garden is divided into a series of rooms filled with informal arrangements of plants around a theme: the White Garden, the Purple Border, the Rose Garden, the Herb Garden, the Lime Walk, and the Cottage Garden. The White Garden has cascades of white flowers and is surrounded by other white and grey plants. Sissinghurst Garden is a must visit for the garden lover. It is among the most famous gardens in England and is designated Grade I on Historic England's register of historic parks and gardens. 

Chatsworth

The world-famous grounds of Chatsworth House, home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, this garden sits within a landscape archetype – an 18th century tour de force of drama and stage management by Capability Brown. The drama continues throughout the garden itself with a 300-year-old water cascade down the central axis, and a stately French baroque style Canal Pond that stretches for almost 300m. These are just two of many water-based extravagances, in addition to the vast planted borders, a maze and superlative greenhouses. The 105-acre garden (within an estate of over 12,000 acres) seemingly has everything,and is one of the grandest open to the public today.

The Beth Chatto Gardens

A big favourite of our friends, and garden designers of the Sitting Spiritually Garden, Jarman Murphy, as horticulture moves slowly towards adopting more sustainable methods, there were some were there well before everyone else – and none more so than the famous gravel garden at Beth Chatto’s garden, which is never irrigated, and yet flourishes in one of the driest parts of the UK. The eponymous creator started work here in 1960, creating various different spaces, including the Scree garden and the Water garden. Her legacy as a garden builder and plants woman continues despite her death in 2018, aged 95. She was involved with the garden until her last breath.

Great Dixter
Great Dixter
Sissinghurst
Sissinghurst
Chatsworth
Chatsworth
Beth Chatto Garden
Beth Chatto Garden

If you have a favourite garden you like to visit, do let us know as we'd love to revisit this subject , you can email Siobhan to tell her

Posted by Siobhan on June 30th 2020


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